News for Periodical Studies

.

  1. CFP: ‘The Visual Politics of Independent Print Media in the Twentieth Century’. This is for a panel at the Association of Art History Conference, hosted jointly by Newcastle and Northumbria Universities and taking place from 1-3 April 2020. Victoria Bazin (Northumbria) and Louise Siddons (Oklahoma State). The deadline for abstracts is 21stOctober 2019. 
     https://forarthistory.org.uk/our-work/conference/2020-annual-conference/the-visual-politics-of-independent-print-media-in-the-twentieth-century/)
  2. CFP: Future States­­: modernity and national identity in popular magazines, 1890–1945 A nearly carbon-neutral conference (NCNC) 23 Mar–5 April 2020, University of Brighton, UK. The organisers are particularly keen to hear from scholars working in periodical studies. https://arthist.net/archive/21693/view=pdf Deadline Nov 4th, 2019.
  3. Event: Media Building: Architecture, Communication and the Built Environment: From Fleet Street to Facebook at Mediacity UK, University of Salford, 8-9 July, 2020. Cfp and details are here: https://mediabuilding.weebly.com/
  4. Essay Prize: The Research Society for American Periodicals invites submissions for its 2018-19 Article Prize. The prize is awarded to the best article on the subject of American periodicals published in a peer-reviewed academic journal between January 1, 2018 and December 31, 2019. RSAP takes an expansive view of periodicals and will consider any article that focuses on serial publications in print or digital form in the Americas, broadly construed.  We also welcome submissions from any field or discipline. The Article Prize is designed for early-career scholars. Graduate students and those who received their Ph.D. no earlier than January 1, 2014 are eligible to apply. The prizewinner will be awarded $1000. The prizewinner and two honorable mentions will be provided with a one-year membership to the Research Society for American Periodicals, which includes a subscription to the society’s journal, American Periodicals. The winner and two honorable mentions will be invited to participate in an RSAP Article Prize Roundtable held at the 2020 American Literature Association conference, to be held from May 21-24 in San Diego, CA. All roundtable participants will be reimbursed for travel expenses related to the conference (up to $1000). To apply, please email a .pdf version of the article and a completed registration form to Brian Sweeney at sweeneyb@strose.edu The registration form can be found here: https://tinyurl.com/yyok8asa In order to be considered, all submissions must be received by December 1, 2019.
Advertisements

updated programme….

 The Network of American Periodical Studies Presents….. 

Serial [Gendered] Subjects: Periodicals, Identities, Communities 

Northumbria University, September 20th, 2019 

(Hedley Suite, Sandyford Building, Northumbria University) 

The symposium is hosted by the Humanities Research Institute and the Gendered Subjects Research Group at Northumbria University and is supported by the University of Sussex Centre for American Studies, the Women’s History Network and the British Association for American Studies. 

Keynote speaker: Professor Mary Chapman, (University of British Columbia) “Slave Girls and Underground Railways in the Periodical Publications and Biography of Edith Eaton (Sui Sin Far) 

Registration: £15 waged /£5 postgraduates/unwaged. Includes lunch and refreshments. https://store.northumbria.ac.uk/conferences-and-events/arts-design-social-sciences/conferences/serial-gendered-subjects-periodicals-identities-communities 

Programme

9.00 – 9.30       Coffee and Registration

9.30 – 9.45       Welcome (Victoria Bazin, Sue Currell, Rosie White)

9.45 – 11.15     Mediating Gender in Magazines

                        Chair: Sue Currell, Sussex University

Annabel Friedrichs (Leibniz University, Hannover): ‘Up-to-Date and On Time : Rose O’Neill’s New Woman Series in Up-to-DateMagazine, 1896’

Barnaby Haran (University of Hull): ‘The “Girl Photographer” of the Machine Age: Margaret Bourke-White at Fortune

Marie-Andrée Bergeron (University of Calgary) & Jean-Philippe Warren (Concordia University): ‘A Gendered Chic. Odette Oligny’s Ambivalent Audacity in 1954 Quebec’

11.15 – 11.30  Comfort Break

11.30 – 12.30  Feminist Activism and Periodical Culture

                        Chair: Rosie White, Northumbria University

Rachael Alexander (Strathclyde University, Glasgow): ‘Alive, Practical and Different’: Relational Periodical Identities and Transatlantic Feminisms in the 1990s’

Mel Waters (Northumbria University): ‘Risky Ms.-ness? The Business of Women’s Liberation Periodicals in the 1970s’

12.30 – 1.45    Lunch (NB: participants will be able to choose to join in the climate strike demonstration taking place on campus during that time).

1.45 – 3.15      Gender and Seriality in American Periodicals

Chair: Kirsten E. Shepherd-Barr, Oxford University

Matthew Pethers (University of Nottingham): ‘Seriality, Serialization, Series: Textual Temporalities and the Gendering of Post-Revolutionary American Fiction’

Sarah Galletly (University College Dublin): ‘Around the Table: Gender, Performativity, and Seriality in L.M. Montgomery’s “Cynthia” columns’

Jude Davies (University of Winchester): ‘Women’s Agency in the Delineator magazine and the Child-Rescue Campaign, 1907-1910’

3.15 – 3.30      Coffee

3.30 – 5.00      Radical ‘little’ Magazines: Poetry, Pedagogy and Politics

                        Chair: Ann-Marie Einhaus, Northumbria University

Francesca Bratton (Durham University): ‘Radical politics, pedagogy, and the women of The Modern School

Sue Currell (Sussex University): ‘Sexual and Political Dissidence in the New Massesmagazine’

Dr Rona Cran (University of Birmingham): ‘Who will help me put out this magazine?’: Women poets and the mimeograph revolution in mid-century New York

5.00 – 5.15      Comfort Break

5.15 – 6.15      Keynote, Professor Mary Chapman (University of British Columbia): “Slave Girls and Underground Railways in the Periodical Publications and Biography of Edith Eaton (Sui Sin Far)

Chair: Brian Ward, Northumbria University

To register please follow this link: https://store.northumbria.ac.uk/conferences-and-events/arts-design-social-sciences/conferences/serial-gendered-subjects-periodicals-identities-communities 

Serial [Gendered] Subjects: Periodicals, Identities, Communities

Northumbria University, September 20th, 2019

mags

Keynote speaker: Professor Mary Chapman, (University of British Columbia) “Slave Girls and Underground Railways in the Periodical Publications and Biography of Edith Eaton (Sui Sin Far)

Registration: £15 waged /£5 postgraduates/unwaged. Includes lunch and refreshments.

https://store.northumbria.ac.uk/conferences-and-events/arts-design-social-sciences/conferences/serial- gendered-subjects-periodicals-identities-communities

Programme

9.00 – 9.30       Coffee and Registration

9.30 – 9.45       Welcome (Victoria Bazin, Sue Currell, Rosie White)

9.45 – 11.15     Mediating Gender in Magazines

                        Chair: Sue Currell, Sussex University

  • Annabel Friedrichs (Leibniz University, Hannover): ‘Up-to-Date and On Time : Rose O’Neill’s New Woman Series in Up-to-DateMagazine, 1896’
  • Barnaby Haran (University of Hull): ‘The “Girl Photographer” of the Machine Age: Margaret Bourke-White at Fortune
  • Marie-Andrée Bergeron (University of Calgary) & Jean-Philippe Warren (Concordia University): ‘A Gendered Chic. Odette Oligny’s Ambivalent Audacity in 1954 Quebec’

11.30 – 1.00    Gender and Seriality in American Periodicals

Chair: Kirsten E. Shepherd-Barr, Oxford University

  • Matthew Pethers (University of Nottingham): ‘Seriality, Serialization, Series: Textual Temporalities and the Gendering of Post-Revolutionary American Fiction’
  • Sarah Galletly (University College Dublin): ‘Around the Table: Gender, Performativity, and Seriality in L.M. Montgomery’s “Cynthia” columns’
  • Jude Davies (University of Winchester): ‘Women’s Agency in the Delineator magazine and the Child-Rescue Campaign, 1907-1910’

1.00 – 2.00      Lunch

2.00 – 3.30      Radical ‘little’ Magazines: Poetry, Pedagogy and Politics

                        Chair: Ann-Marie Einhaus, Northumbria University

  • Francesca Bratton (Durham University): ‘Radical politics, pedagogy, and the women of The Modern School
  • Sue Currell (Sussex University): ‘Sexual and Political Dissidence in the New Massesmagazine’
  • Dr Rona Cran (University of Birmingham): ‘Who will help me put out this magazine?’: Women poets and the mimeograph revolution in mid-century New York

3.30 – 3.45      Coffee/Tea

3.45 – 4.45      Feminist Activism and Periodical Culture

                        Chair: Rosie White, Northumbria University

  • Rachael Alexander (Strathclyde University, Glasgow): ‘Alive, Practical and Different’: Relational Periodical Identities and Transatlantic Feminisms in the 1990s’
  • Mel Waters (Northumbria University): ‘Risky Ms.-ness? The Business of Women’s Liberation Periodicals in the 1970s’

4.45 – 5.00       Comfort Break

5.00 – 6.00      Keynote, Professor Mary Chapman (University of British Columbia): “Slave Girls and Underground Railways in the Periodical Publications and Biography of Edith Eaton (Sui Sin Far) Chair: Brian Ward, Northumbria University

To register please follow this link:  https://store.northumbria.ac.uk/conferences-and-events/arts-design-social-sciences/conferences/serial-gendered-subjects-periodicals-identities-communities

 

Taking place at the Hedley Suite, Sandyford Building, Northumbria University. 

The symposium is hosted by the Humanities Research Institute and the Gendered Subjects Research Group at Northumbria University and is supported by the University of Sussex Centre for American Studies, the Women’s History Network and the British Association for American Studies.

Serial [Gendered] Subjects: Periodicals, Identities, Communities

CFP: Network of American Periodical Studies symposium at Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne, September 20th, 2019. Plenary speaker: Professor Mary Chapman, University of British Columbia, author of Making Noise, Making News: Suffrage Print Culture and U.S. Modernism(2014), 

Serial [Gendered] Subjects: Periodicals, Identities, Communities

What is the relationship between gender and the serial form of the magazine? To what extent are gendered ‘stereotypes’, a term first deployed to refer to new print technologies, reproduced and/or contested in periodicals? How might the affordances of the magazine, its seriality, heterogeneity and periodicity be understood in terms of gender? What is the effect of what Ann Ardis describes as the ‘complexly performative authorial environment’ of magazines, the play of signed, pseudonymous and anonymous texts in circulation that often obscures authorial or artistic origins? How does this complicate recovery projects by making it difficult to identify an historical, gendered subject available for recovery? How does gender intersect with race, social class, sexuality and nation and to what extent is it possible or even helpful to examine gender as a distinct category? How are identities and communities attached to magazines and in what ways do they mobilise political subjects within the public and counter-public spheres? Do particular patterns, rhythms and structures persist to create gendered boundaries within the textual space of the magazine? Does gender play a role in the relationships between verbal and visual media? How useful is W.J.T. Mitchell’s assertion that the laws of genre relate to the laws of gender and sexual economies of power, knowledge and desire, that pictures are gendered as the feminised ‘other’ to the word? To what extent are particular affects circulated within magazines and how are those affects related to questions of gender?

These are some of the questions we would like to address in the next Network of American Periodical Studies symposium at Northumbria University on September 20th, 2019. We invite submissions from colleagues working on any aspect of periodical culture, from within or across any disciplinary boundaries and historical periods. While the network focuses on research on American periodicals, given the transnational nature of magazine and newspaper circulation, we encourage scholars working on periodicals from around the world to identify synergies and connections between America and non-American print cultures. The network defines ‘America’ not simply as the United States but to include the nations that form that continent.

We are delighted to announce that Professor Mary Chapman of the University of British Columbia will be giving the plenary lecture at the symposium. Professor Chapman is the author of Making Noise, Making News: Suffrage Print Culture and U.S. Modernism(2014), co-editor of Treacherous Texts: US Suffrage Literature, 1846-1946 (2011) and Becoming Sui Sin Far: Early Fiction, Journalism and Travel Writing by Edith Maude Eaton (2017).

Please send 300 word abstracts and accompanying one-page CVs to the symposium organizers, Dr Victoria Bazin Victoria.Bazin@northumbria.ac.ukand Dr Sue Currell S.Currell@sussex.ac.ukby July 15th2019.

Content Stinks!

Now Available: Review of this symposium published in US Studies Online written by Tomos Hughes.

Content Stinks! The Forms, Materials, and Institutions of American Periodicals

University of Nottingham, Friday 21st September 2018

This symposium seeks to challenge the narrow content-orientation of much existing periodicals scholarship by engaging with new, deeper and more complex contextualizations of these unique textual objects. In particular, it will showcase work that offers considerations of the American periodical from the perspective not of its content-providers but the perspective of the multiple human and nonhuman actors responsible for assembling and distributing what in the aggregate is a mass of literary material simply too large and various for conventional interpretive approaches.
Taken up as a mantra by various literary critics concerned with overturning the tendency to critique texts as ideological objects, Bruno Latour’s recent assertion that “Context stinks! It’s a way of stopping the description when you are too tired or lazy to go on,” has underpinned a constellation of recent approaches to literature that show a renewed attention to aesthetics, close reading, or genre. Although primarily concerned to date with the traditional literary foci of novels, poems and plays, the rejection of New Historicist modes of contextualization under the rubric of what Rita Felski has called “postcritical reading” has much to offer scholars working on periodical culture. But at the same time, if any single hermeneutic strategy can be said to have retarded the progress of periodical studies it is the field’s consistent privileging of content over context. Students of the periodical have typically borrowed their means of analysing them from the study of other forms. Texts – often by already canonical writers – are prised from the wealth of matter published in magazines and newspapers and subjected to detailed descriptive readings that abstract them entirely from their broader periodical environment. The problem for periodical studies is not necessarily that it has been too obsessed with context (though its default interpretive lens has tended to be that of ideology) but that it hasn’t engaged imaginatively enough with the range and diversity of possible periodical contexts. This symposium brings together a range of international scholars who offer new ways to begin to apprehend such contexts.

Funded PhD project on “The Reprinting and Subscription Networks of Nineteenth-Century Antislavery Periodicals.”

The Department of American Studies at the University of Nottingham is seeking suitable applicants to undertake a funded PhD project on “The Reprinting and Subscription Networks of Nineteenth-Century Antislavery Periodicals.” The project is one of eight in the area of Data-Driven Research shortlisted by the M3C AHRC consortium, of which four will be financially supported. Both EU and UK nationals are eligible to apply, and transatlantic approaches are welcomed.
 
The deadline for formal applications is Monday 4 June 2018. More details about the project and the application process can be found here: http://www.midlands3cities.ac.uk/funding/artificial-intelligence-and-data-driven-research-project-funding.aspx
 
Potential applicants are encouraged to contact the project supervisors, Dr Matthew Pethers (matthew.pethers@nottingham.ac.uk) and Dr Graham Thompson (graham.thompson@nottingham.ac.uk), with any queries.

CFP: NAPS Symposium Sept 2018

Network of American Periodical Studies

Deadline Extended: Please send 300 word abstracts and accompanying one-page CVs to the symposium organizers, Dr Matthew Pethers (matthew.pethers@nottingham.ac.uk) and Dr Graham Thompson (graham.thompson@nottingham.ac.uk), by Tuesday 1st May 2018.

CONTENT STINKS!

THE FORMS, MATERIALS, AND INSTITUTIONS OF AMERICAN PERIODICALS

munseysA one day symposium of the Network of American Periodical Studies
University of Nottingham – Friday 21st September 2018

300 word abstracts and accompanying one-page CVs are due to the symposium organizers, Dr Matthew Pethers (matthew.pethers@nottingham.ac.uk) and Dr Graham Thompson (graham.thompson@nottingham.ac.uk), by Monday April 16th 2018.

“Context stinks! It’s a way of stopping the description when you are too tired or lazy to go on,” Bruno Latour declares in Reassembling the Social (2005). Taken up as a mantra by various literary critics concerned with overturning the tendency to critique texts as ideological objects, the idea that “context stinks” particularly…

View original post 360 more words